paintmd-ness

prostheticknowledge:

Google Cardboard

Lo-fi simplified VR from Google I/O is an open-source solution to view steroscopic content on the web with your Android smartphone.

This isn’t the first of it’s kind (there is FOV2GO and many independent efforts) but this is certainly a decent framework and platform ready for experimentation. It’s nothing that will compete with high end technology (although that has benefited from developments in smartphone components such as gyroscopes and displays).

Below is a video from the I/O conference - it is 45 minutes long and a lot is focused on the development side, but the first 15 minutes will give you a good idea about what can be possible:

Virtual reality has made exciting progress over the past several years. However, developing for VR still requires expensive, specialized hardware. Thinking about how to make VR accessible to more people, a group of VR enthusiasts at Google experimented with using a smartphone to drive VR experiences.

The result is Cardboard, a no-frills enclosure that transforms a phone into a basic VR headset, and the accompanying open software toolkit that makes writing VR software as simple as building a web or mobile app.

By making it easy and inexpensive to experiment with VR, we hope to encourage developers to build the next generation of immersive digital experiences and make them available to everyone.

All the instructions + designs and more information can be found at the project homepage here

A kit with everything you will need with all the pieces can be ordered from Dodocase here

A collection of experiments ready for this system can be found here

fastcodesign:

A new visualization from NASA illustrates a rare piece of good news about our environment’s health: air pollution levels in major U.S. cities have significantly decreased from 2005 to 2011.
Read More>

fastcodesign:

A new visualization from NASA illustrates a rare piece of good news about our environment’s health: air pollution levels in major U.S. cities have significantly decreased from 2005 to 2011.

Read More>

fastcompany:

This Floating Billboard Is Cleaning Up A Polluted River in Manila
20 years ago, Manila’s Pasig River was considered biologically dead. But there is a campaign to rehabilitate the waterway that cuts through the city and now a Japanese natural cosmetics brand is using a creative billboard to lend a hand in the cleanup efforts. … Spelling out “Clean River Soon,” according to the brand the installation is capable of cleaning between 2,000 and 8,000 gallons of water every day.
Slideshow> 

fastcompany:

This Floating Billboard Is Cleaning Up A Polluted River in Manila

20 years ago, Manila’s Pasig River was considered biologically dead. But there is a campaign to rehabilitate the waterway that cuts through the city and now a Japanese natural cosmetics brand is using a creative billboard to lend a hand in the cleanup efforts. … Spelling out “Clean River Soon,” according to the brand the installation is capable of cleaning between 2,000 and 8,000 gallons of water every day.

Slideshow> 

(via goodideaexchange)

annstreetstudio:

The magnificent nature of Bali…

National Catholic Report: Climate change is Catholic church's No. 1 pro-life issue

climateadaptation:

Bright and refreshing read by the NRC. They go all-in on climate change action and working with scientists, rather than against them. They also embrace Pope Francis’s call for increasing science education and sustainable lifestyles.

There may have been a time when moving from a point of indecision on the matter of climate change, to a decision on whether it is real and caused by humans or not, required leaps of faith of somewhat equal proportions. But that was a long time and a lot of science ago.

The science, as it has developed, may not be perfect, but it is long past time that the question turn from whether human activity is causing climate change to what do we do about it.

The Catholic church should become a major player in educating the public to the scientific data and in motivating people to act for change.

The case for the reality of human-caused climate change was made in the strongest terms to date in the recently released third National Climate Assessment, a report exhaustive in its detail and the manner of its preparation. It was compiled by a team of more than 300 experts, including policymakers, decision-makers from the public and private realms, researchers, representatives of business and nongovernmental organizations, as well as representatives of the general public.

It was reviewed extensively, including by a panel of the National Academy of Sciences, the 13 federal agencies of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, and the federal Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Sustainability.

The problem is enormous, but so is the opportunity for the church to use its resources, its access to some of the best experts in its academies and the attention of those in its parochial structures to begin to educate. This is a human life issue of enormous proportions, and one in which the young should be fully engaged. The Climate Assessment document as well as the recent discussion at the Vatican are excellent starting points for developing curricula materials for education programs in parishes and schools.

nevver:

Design Crush
spaceplasma:

Rosetta’s Target Comet 

The Rosetta spacecraft captured this remarkable series of 9 frames between March 27 and May 4, as it closed from 5 million to 2 million kilometers of its target comet. Cruising along a 6.5 year orbit toward closest approach to the Sun next year, periodic comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is seen moving past a distant background of stars in Sagittarius and gobular star cluster M104. The comet’s developing coma is actually visible by the end of the sequence, extending for some 1300 km into space. Rosetta is scheduled for an early August rendezvous with the comet’s nucleus. Now clearly active, the nucleus is about 4 kilometers in diameter, releasing the dusty coma as its dirty ices begin to sublimate in the sunlight. The Rosetta lander’s contact with the surface of the nucleus is anticipated in November.

Credit: ESA / Rosetta / MPS OSIRIS Team

spaceplasma:

Rosetta’s Target Comet

The Rosetta spacecraft captured this remarkable series of 9 frames between March 27 and May 4, as it closed from 5 million to 2 million kilometers of its target comet. Cruising along a 6.5 year orbit toward closest approach to the Sun next year, periodic comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is seen moving past a distant background of stars in Sagittarius and gobular star cluster M104. The comet’s developing coma is actually visible by the end of the sequence, extending for some 1300 km into space. Rosetta is scheduled for an early August rendezvous with the comet’s nucleus. Now clearly active, the nucleus is about 4 kilometers in diameter, releasing the dusty coma as its dirty ices begin to sublimate in the sunlight. The Rosetta lander’s contact with the surface of the nucleus is anticipated in November.

Credit: ESA / Rosetta / MPS OSIRIS Team

wildcat2030:

A dragon grows in England — and the fantastic beast surprisingly has nothing to do with Game of Thrones or the next Harry Potter film. Norfolk native John Brooker cultivates the creature out of his own hedges, tending to them for hours every day to get each snarling tooth and pointy claw just right.  At about 100-feet long and 20-feet tall, this definitely isn’t your garden variety shrub. J.K. Rowling might want to get this guy’s number. (via English Gardener Grows Dragon in Front Yard)

wildcat2030:

A dragon grows in England — and the fantastic beast surprisingly has nothing to do with Game of Thrones or the next Harry Potter film. Norfolk native John Brooker cultivates the creature out of his own hedges, tending to them for hours every day to get each snarling tooth and pointy claw just right.
At about 100-feet long and 20-feet tall, this definitely isn’t your garden variety shrub. J.K. Rowling might want to get this guy’s number.
(via English Gardener Grows Dragon in Front Yard)