paintmd-ness

earthlynation:

Monarch of Denali tundra (by Ania.Photography - busy)

earthlynation:

Monarch of Denali tundra (by Ania.Photography - busy)

chrisburkard:

This mornings sunrise

chrisburkard:

This mornings sunrise

spaceexp:

Alignment of Callisto and Europa, captured by the Cassini spacecraft in 2000

spaceexp:

Alignment of Callisto and Europa, captured by the Cassini spacecraft in 2000

(via infinity-imagined)

fastcompany:

When we’re left to our own pace to complete training, do we take advantage of the flexibility or fizzle out?
Employers and employees still value training. But the old gold standard—sequestering employees in classes for extended periods of time—is falling out of favor.
“We’re seeing a huge decrease in the amount of time people are spending in training rooms and classrooms,” says Janet Pogue, principal and global workplace leader at Gensler, a design firm that studies how people use office spaces (among other things). Instead, employers increasingly rely on modules that allow people to learn at their own pace, on their own schedules.
Read More>

fastcompany:

When we’re left to our own pace to complete training, do we take advantage of the flexibility or fizzle out?

Employers and employees still value training. But the old gold standard—sequestering employees in classes for extended periods of time—is falling out of favor.

“We’re seeing a huge decrease in the amount of time people are spending in training rooms and classrooms,” says Janet Pogue, principal and global workplace leader at Gensler, a design firm that studies how people use office spaces (among other things). Instead, employers increasingly rely on modules that allow people to learn at their own pace, on their own schedules.

Read More>

piavalesca:

from black canyon of the gunnison to telluride

emergentfutures:

FDA Approves First 3D Printed Facial Implants

Full Story: 3dprint

emergentfutures:

FDA Approves First 3D Printed Facial Implants

Full Story: 3dprint

fastcompany:

Can cities reduce traffic congestion and emissions with a private transit network?
The best way to describe JPods, a new form of public transit soon to be tested in New Jersey, is “something out of the Jetsons.” At least that’s how one city official described the solar-powered pods, which are a combination of light rail and self-driving car suspended above roads. Imagine something like a ski lift running above our existing streets and you’re getting close to the right mental image.
But there’s one sticking point: The JPods are a private transit system. Will investors be willing to fund a network of pods that compete with light rail, buses, subways, and other current public transit options? And if the capital was there, would municipal governments let this happen?
Read More>

fastcompany:

Can cities reduce traffic congestion and emissions with a private transit network?

The best way to describe JPods, a new form of public transit soon to be tested in New Jersey, is “something out of the Jetsons.” At least that’s how one city official described the solar-powered pods, which are a combination of light rail and self-driving car suspended above roads. Imagine something like a ski lift running above our existing streets and you’re getting close to the right mental image.

But there’s one sticking point: The JPods are a private transit system. Will investors be willing to fund a network of pods that compete with light rail, buses, subways, and other current public transit options? And if the capital was there, would municipal governments let this happen?

Read More>

Larry Lessig and EFF sue music licensing company over bogus YouTube copyright claims [2013]

When Larry Lessig used a clip from “Lisztomania” by the French band Phoenix in a lecture, he was pretty sure that it was fair use — after all, he’s written several books on copyright and teaches at Harvard Law. But Liberation Music, who claim the license to the song, had the video of Lessig’s…

(via emergentfutures)

bpod-mrc:

24 August 2014
The High Life
When people live at high altitude, where oxygen is limited, their bodies usually produce a higher number of red blood cells. The more red blood cells present, the more oxygen can be lugged around the body… up to a point. This response can cause the blood to become thick and sticky with oxygen-carrying red blood cells, which can increase the risk of heart failure. A study has found that highland inhabitants of the Tibetan plateau (pictured) possess a unique genetic variant that enables them to survive in the oxygen-thin air. The researchers believe that this EGLN1 gene, which entered the Tibetan population 8,000 years ago, serves to protect highland Tibetans against an over-eager response to low oxygen levels. Because oxygen plays a central role in disease, a deep understanding of how high altitude adaptations work may lead to novel treatments for various diseases, including cancer.
Written by Nick Kennedy
—
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on FlickrNASAOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 2.0)Research published in Nature Genetics, August 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

24 August 2014

The High Life

When people live at high altitude, where oxygen is limited, their bodies usually produce a higher number of red blood cells. The more red blood cells present, the more oxygen can be lugged around the body… up to a point. This response can cause the blood to become thick and sticky with oxygen-carrying red blood cells, which can increase the risk of heart failure. A study has found that highland inhabitants of the Tibetan plateau (pictured) possess a unique genetic variant that enables them to survive in the oxygen-thin air. The researchers believe that this EGLN1 gene, which entered the Tibetan population 8,000 years ago, serves to protect highland Tibetans against an over-eager response to low oxygen levels. Because oxygen plays a central role in disease, a deep understanding of how high altitude adaptations work may lead to novel treatments for various diseases, including cancer.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr
NASA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 2.0)
Research published in Nature Genetics, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

(via articulomortis)