paintmd-ness

explore-blog:

Maya Angelou on courage and facing evil

23pairsofchromosomes:

Your daily dose of Myoviridae TEM images:

Here’s a nice picture of some Myoviridae phage which infect Salmonella. Generally in the phage world, there are three more common families although others have been found:

  • Siphoviridae with long flexible tails. (P2 above)
  • Myoviridae with long contractile tails (T4 above)
  • Podoviridae with short non-contractile tails. (P22 above)

Phage are first classified based on their morphologies, but bioinformatic information shows the relationships between the families. Typically families of phage are grouped on their appearance as a large amount of the phage genome goes into making the structural proteins.

Myoviridae are quite interesting in the sense that when they bind their host, there are large visible structural changes in the tail region. The tail sheath contracts and the DNA is transported from the head into the bacterium. Other less visible mechanisms are present in the other two morphology types too.

Sam

(via currentsinbiology)

springwise:

App translates sports fans’ cheers from the armchair to the stadium
During the height of the Arab Spring, the Tunisian government banned crowds from gathering at games played by the soccer team C.S Hammam-Lif. To enable fans to continue supporting their team, the Mobilizing the 12th Man campaign translated virtual clapping and cheering from an app into real sound played through speakers in the stadium. Although these were special circumstances, the average fan can also be locked out of supporting their teams in person thanks to extortionate ticket prices and the cost of traveling to away games. The UK’s Fanmode is an app that enables stay-at-home sports fans to have their support broadcast at the game venue. READ MORE…

springwise:

App translates sports fans’ cheers from the armchair to the stadium

During the height of the Arab Spring, the Tunisian government banned crowds from gathering at games played by the soccer team C.S Hammam-Lif. To enable fans to continue supporting their team, the Mobilizing the 12th Man campaign translated virtual clapping and cheering from an app into real sound played through speakers in the stadium. Although these were special circumstances, the average fan can also be locked out of supporting their teams in person thanks to extortionate ticket prices and the cost of traveling to away games. The UK’s Fanmode is an app that enables stay-at-home sports fans to have their support broadcast at the game venue. READ MORE…

futurejournalismproject:

Photographing Ebola in Liberia
John Moore, a senior staff photographer from Getty Images, is covering the Ebola outbreak in Liberia.
In the New York Times, he writes:

I have worked in high-risk environments with some frequency in my career, but instead of a flak jacket and helmet, this time I brought anticontamination suits, including coveralls, masks, goggles, rubber gloves and boot covers, all of which are disposable after a single use in places like Ebola isolation wards. I stocked up on antiseptic gel, wipes and sprays. I also brought rubber boots, which were lent to me by my father-in-law, a retired journalist who is now a fisherman. He said I could keep them.
Here in Liberia, I wash my hands in chlorinated water at the entrance to most buildings, dozens of times a day, whether I have gloves on or not. Because Ebola is not airborne but is rather transmitted through bodily fluids, it’s important not to touch your face after being in contaminated areas. We tend to touch our faces many times per day without realizing it. I’m trying hard to stay safe.

The Times has a gallery of Moore’s images here.
Bonus: Yesterday, NPR interviewed Moore about an incident in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, where protestors attacked a quarantine center and forced its patients to leave the facility. Moore tells NPR that “a fair number of people… believe that the Ebola virus and the epidemic is a hoax, that it’s not real after all, and it’s a way for the Liberian government to bring in foreign money.”
Image: John Moore wears his “personal protectuve equipment” before joining a Liberian burial team that was a removing the body of an Ebola victim from her home, via the Daily Mail. The Mail also has a gallery of Moore’s work. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Photographing Ebola in Liberia

John Moore, a senior staff photographer from Getty Images, is covering the Ebola outbreak in Liberia.

In the New York Times, he writes:

I have worked in high-risk environments with some frequency in my career, but instead of a flak jacket and helmet, this time I brought anticontamination suits, including coveralls, masks, goggles, rubber gloves and boot covers, all of which are disposable after a single use in places like Ebola isolation wards. I stocked up on antiseptic gel, wipes and sprays. I also brought rubber boots, which were lent to me by my father-in-law, a retired journalist who is now a fisherman. He said I could keep them.

Here in Liberia, I wash my hands in chlorinated water at the entrance to most buildings, dozens of times a day, whether I have gloves on or not. Because Ebola is not airborne but is rather transmitted through bodily fluids, it’s important not to touch your face after being in contaminated areas. We tend to touch our faces many times per day without realizing it. I’m trying hard to stay safe.

The Times has a gallery of Moore’s images here.

Bonus: Yesterday, NPR interviewed Moore about an incident in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, where protestors attacked a quarantine center and forced its patients to leave the facility. Moore tells NPR that “a fair number of people… believe that the Ebola virus and the epidemic is a hoax, that it’s not real after all, and it’s a way for the Liberian government to bring in foreign money.”

Image: John Moore wears his “personal protectuve equipment” before joining a Liberian burial team that was a removing the body of an Ebola victim from her home, via the Daily Mail. The Mail also has a gallery of Moore’s work. Select to embiggen.

cabinporn:

Hand-built tent in Dartmoor National Park, Devon UK.
Contributed by Nick Viney. 

cabinporn:

Hand-built tent in Dartmoor National Park, Devon UK.

Contributed by Nick Viney. 

currentsinbiology:

Our ancestor’s ‘leaky’ membrane answers big questions in biology
All life on Earth came from one common ancestor – a single-celled organism – but what it looked like, how it lived and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four billion year old mystery being solved by researchers at UCL using mathematical modelling.
Findings published today in PLOS Biology suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions:
1. Why all cells use the same complex mechanism to harvest energy
2. Why two types of single-celled organism that form the deepest branch on the tree of life – bacteria and archaea – have completely different cell membranes
The leakiness of the membrane allowed LUCA to be powered by energy in its surroundings, most likely vents deep on the ocean floor, whilst holding in all the other components necessary for life.
The team modeled how the membrane changed, enabling LUCA’s descendants to move to new, more challenging environments and evolve into two distinct types of single-celled organism, bacteria and archaea, creating the deepest branch of the tree of life.
Caption: Pumping and phospholipid membranes arose independently in archaea and bacteria. Credit: Victor Sojo et al.

currentsinbiology:

Our ancestor’s ‘leaky’ membrane answers big questions in biology

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor – a single-celled organism – but what it looked like, how it lived and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four billion year old mystery being solved by researchers at UCL using mathematical modelling.

Findings published today in PLOS Biology suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions:

1. Why all cells use the same complex mechanism to harvest energy

2. Why two types of single-celled organism that form the deepest branch on the tree of life – bacteria and archaea – have completely different cell membranes

The leakiness of the membrane allowed LUCA to be powered by energy in its surroundings, most likely vents deep on the ocean floor, whilst holding in all the other components necessary for life.

The team modeled how the membrane changed, enabling LUCA’s descendants to move to new, more challenging environments and evolve into two distinct types of single-celled organism, bacteria and archaea, creating the deepest branch of the tree of life.

Caption: Pumping and phospholipid membranes arose independently in archaea and bacteria. Credit: Victor Sojo et al.

designersofthings:

Linkin Park Gets 3D Printed For Fans 
Linkin Park is the latest music group to leverage the power of 3D printing to market its music. The band has teamed up with German 3D scanning and printing shop, Stramba, to offer realistic figurines of each band member to mark “The Carnivores World Tour 2014”.
Read More

designersofthings:

Linkin Park Gets 3D Printed For Fans 

Linkin Park is the latest music group to leverage the power of 3D printing to market its music. The band has teamed up with German 3D scanning and printing shop, Stramba, to offer realistic figurines of each band member to mark “The Carnivores World Tour 2014”.

Read More

(Source: theguardian.com)

(Source: vimeo.com, via thisistheverge)

mothernaturenetwork:

Living cheap is the new greenIf going green is making you go broke, you’re doing it wrong. Saving resources and saving money go hand in hand. Here’s how to get started.

mothernaturenetwork:

Living cheap is the new green
If going green is making you go broke, you’re doing it wrong. Saving resources and saving money go hand in hand. Here’s how to get started.